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BlogiOS app replaces professional editor with algorithmTuesday, July 28 2015

Triller is a music video app:

…the app will then automatically edit your takes together using an algorithm that’s designed to emulate how a professional editor would cut a music video. Triller looks at the action in your footage, how much the camera itself is moving, and how many faces are detected in each shot to make its editorial decisions. It then cuts everything into tiny clips that are perfectly synced with the song you’ve chosen.

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BlogBlackmagic DaVinci Resolve 2005Monday, July 27 2015

Before Blackmagic Design bought da Vinci Systems in 2009, they had years of hardware and software product history.

Thanks to the Internet Archive, their website from 10 years ago is still preserved.

Included in the archive is a PDF leaflet:

From the genius of da Vinci comes Resolve®, the company’s first software-based color correction system

Note however:

Resolve2K and 2K Plus are registered trademarks of da Vinci Systems, Inc.

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BlogThe Onion: Exhausted Video Editor Can’t Tell If Blooper Reel Is Funny AnymoreMonday, July 27 2015

The Onion, 2006:

Lessner, who said he started the weekend session laughing at the abundance of “blooper gold,” soon lost all perspective when faced with the task of condensing the more than 86 hours of footage—most of which was “almost indistinguishably hilarious”—into a single 26-minute special by his strict Sunday deadline.

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Blog4K playback costs: HEVCAdvance content royalty scheduleMonday, July 27 2015

For people to share video using advanced codecs on the internet and elsewhere, the codecs have to be developed in the first place. The cost of development is then recouped using patent licenses. Sometimes a fee is charged for building a player – whether on a website or in a modern TV, sometimes a free is charged on each time content is played. Paying per play is known as a content royaty.

There are two groups of patent holders associated with the codecs associated with UHD and 4K playback. The HEVC group aren’t charging content royalties, but a second (made up of GE, Technicolor, Mitsubishi, Philips, and Dolby) have just announced their royalty rate.

Jan Ozer has just ran the numbers:

For a $4.00 movie downloaded from Amazon Prime or M-Go, the royalty would be two cents, right in line with MPEG-2/H.264 content royalties. In a Netflix scenario, for a $10/month subscriber who watches 10% of video that uses HEVC, the royalty would only apply to 10% of the subscription price, so the royalty would be about half a penny ($0.005). Assuming the $10 subscriber watches 100% HEVC, the royalty would be a nickel.

HEVCAdvance expects the royalty to be calculated on gross numbers, not on a per-subscriber basis. For an advertising supported site, if HEVC was 30% of all video distributed, the calculation would be 30% x total video-related advertising revenue x .005. In this scenario, if video-related advertising revenue was $1 billion, the royalty would be $1,000,000,000 x .3 x .005, or $1.5 million, a far cry from the $120 million Apple is staring at.

[…]

…no matter how much you dislike the terms offered by HEVCAdvance, dealing with the individual patent holders would have likely been more expensive, and certainly more complicated. IP rights are a reality, so like the T-shirt says, the market will keep calm and carry on.

Read more at the Streaming Learning Center.

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BlogMy free Apple Motion webinar: Exploring animation behaviorsFriday, July 24 2015

It took me years before I got my mind around Apple Motion. I spent a long time trying to learn how to do complex multi-layer keyframed motion graphics like I used to make in Adobe After Effects. I clicked with Motion once I had a more straightforward task: make a simple plugin for Final Cut Pro X.

After making many Final Cut plugins and motion graphics sequences with Motion, I’ve come to know it well. One of the two sessions I taught at the 2015 FCPX Creative Summit was about using Motion’s behaviors for animation.

I’ll be teaching a webinar version of that session on Tuesday called “Exploring Apple Motion Behaviors for Easy Animation“:

The real power behind Apple Motion is behaviors. Behaviors use the power of complex calculations and real-time rendering to produce results in minutes that would take hours to create and modify using keyframes or complex math. Behaviors can control almost everything in Motion — including graphics, text, particles and cameras. Alex will show behaviors controlling graphics and particles and show how much fun you can have by playing with behaviors in Motion.

Register for free to watch live and ask questions at the Moviola website.

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BlogFinal Cut Pro X and mobile journalism: Audio and metadataFriday, July 24 2015

In recent years, more of TV and internet news features recordings made on mobile phones. iPhones and Andoid phones are also being used by professional journalists. The art and science of using consumer technology this way is known as Mobile Journalism. There are blogs, Twitter hashtags and conferences on the subject.

Final Cut Pro X is the editing software ‘for the rest of us’ – designed for professionals in many fields as well as editing. That means broadcast news organisations are training all sorts of staff in using X (Some would say everyone but the editors).

After a few years of steadily improving camera phones and video editing applications that run on iOS and Android, the quality of mobile audio recording is now catching up. Recent devices bypass microphones designed for telephone conversations.

Recently Glen Mulcahy of Irish national TV and radio broadcaster RTÉ compared two systems that connect via the iPhone’s lightning port:

Today I got my hands on the Sennheiser ClipMic Digital mic for iOS so I decided to shoot a quick unboxing video and then do an audio test and a video test to pitch it against the iKmultimedia iRigPro and AKG 417pp Lav which we currently use for Mobile Journalism here in RTÉ.

He used the Apogee MetaRecorder iOS app which includes metadata tagging for those editing MoJo footage in Final Cut Pro X.

Ripple Training’s video on how marker, keyword and role information captured on location can be imported into Final Cut:

ClipMic Digital is a new Microphone from Sennheiser that turns your iPhone or iPad into a professional digital audio recorder. By downloading the companion App from Apogge, you can record and add metadata to your recordings that can be read my Final Cut Pro X via XML. This is one of the COOLEST app/mics we’ve ever used!

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