Sway: Microsoft’s vs. Apple’s market engagement

Thursday, 06 August 2015

During my lunch with Philip Hodgetts, he said that it is Apple’s policy to always provide tools the support personal creativity. Given that Apple don’t seem to consider other video editing software as competition for their products, it’s worth looking at other tools that might be.

Microsoft Sway is a presentation/motion graphics creation tool that isn't at all like Microsoft PowerPoint or Adobe After Effects. As you can see in this Microsoft video on YouTube, users define the structure of the story they want to tell and the content they want to work with and leave the design up to Sway.

This works very well when you want to tell a story that works across a variety of screen sizes, aspect ratios and orientations. Here’s product manager Chris Pratley as quoted by Fast Company:

“Once they realize, ‘Oh right, I’m designing something that works across devices, and the way I do that is by expressing my intent rather than all these pixel-level sizes and so on,’ they have this eureka moment”

Microsoft learning from their market

An interesting aspect of the development of Sway is how Microsoft seemed to work with the potential audience for Sway:

The last time I spoke with Pratley, he mentioned that Sway was an experiment in letting users dictate the direction of a product. While he won’t come to any conclusions yet, he now points to the Windows 10 Insider program as an example of the company opening up more to outside suggestions.

”I actually think it’s the new way that everything new will be made, and we’re going to be adapting this to be the sort of agile approach where we react to feedback for everything else that already exists,” Pratley says.

Apple’s market insight?

The Apple position is that they don’t ask what a possble market wants. They work like Pixar: the policy is to make products and services for people like themselves, then work out which markets also need those tools. 

That works as long as the people who work at Apple aren’t too different from the people who make up the markets they want to sell to.

That means those of us who are interested in the future of Final Cut and iMovie shouldn’t tell Apple want we want; we should make sure Apple understand us well enough for them to give us what they think we need.

EDL-X 2.0: For Final Cut Pro X offline editors

Wednesday, 05 August 2015

Although devoted fans would say that whole productions can be edited and finished in Final Cut, X plays very well with other post production applications. It has an XML format that supports full transfer of timelines to other applications. Sometimes these applications support X XML import and sometimes intermediary applications are needed.

Editors who need to collaborate with those who use high-end systems used in big budget commercials and music videos use XMiL EDL-X to convert Final Cut Pro X XML to the CMX 3600 industry standard EDL format.

Hollywood-based feature film trailer editor Charlie Austin: “EDL-X is indispensable for finishing offline cuts here in L.A. EDLs are still a ‘universal’ way to talk to pretty much any video application and they’re required by most post houses here.”

The version 2.0 update is out now (Mac App Store link):

  • Role Filtering: control what footage is included based on Roles assigned in FCP X.
  • Support for retimed footage on all nesting levels.
  • List Effects including some parameters and keyframes.
  • Fades at the head or tail of clips can be represented as dissolves in the EDL.
  • EDL-X can be used as a Share Destination straight from FCP X's Share menu. This means that an XML file doesn't have to be explicitly saved to disk any more, and sequences/cuts/projects can be made to EDL-X from FCP X in a single step.

If you already have an older version, the version 2.0 update is free.

The fact that an application used for such tasks is being updated to match the needs of offline editors shows there is a market for such tools.

Charlie tweeted:

London based commercials and music video editor Vid Price says “Speed changes on all levels is a massive one for me. If I change the speed of a clip that I've synced through Sync-N-Link there's previously been no easy way to get this out as an EDL. I used to have to eye match the original non synced shot and try and match the retime. Not any more!!”

Award-winning ad editor Thomas Grove Carter has tried it out and says “This is a FANTASTIC update. It's really very good! One example: If you have a Multicam clip where one of the angles is sped up 200% inside, and you speed up the Multicam clip itself to 150%, EDL-X will correctly represent this a 300% speed change in the EDL. Same goes for compound clips!”

NLE audio: Tracks vs. the magnetic timeline and roles

Wednesday, 05 August 2015

If you'd like to see how the combination of the magnetic timeline and roles compares with traditional track organisation, check out the first part of a three part blog post from finalBUG, the FCPX Berlin User Group’s blog:

I thought that I would look at constructing a very simple edit in Da Vinci Resolve versus Final Cut Pro X and whilst I was at it I thought that I would throw Legacy Final Cut Pro into the mix.

[…]The holy grail at least in the world of broadcast being patching multiple audio tracks for multiple clips to a common destination.​ I hope that you find this comparison useful.​

In Part 2:

In this sixth video I swap out some clips and groups of clips. A lot of human error is eliminated straight out of the gate. There is a reason why Video and Audio are in the same clip so to speak. And with Roles set up correctly I can move stuff and do not have to worry about track collisions and other unpleasant surprises.​

Part 3:

…here is the disclaimer. I was never a fan of tracks, I found it strange that I had to be constantly thinking about technical stuff such as, what goes where. Surely​ it make sense to be able to concentrate on the edit and simply setting those in and out points to build a story. Trackless does not automatically mean clueless!​!!

 

New Intel CPU: Candidate for next iMac?

Wednesday, 05 August 2015

For the last few years Apple have been waiting Intel to deliver better CPUs for use in iMacs, Macbooks and Mac Pros. Today saw the launch of their Skylake series of chips.

Today's launch of the Skylake archirecture doesn’t point to a big update for the Mac Pro, but it might be good news for iMac fans.

Ars Technica

Many people are still using a PC [e.g. 27" 2011 iMac] with a Sandy Bridge chip such as the Core i7-2600K, which will still hold its own in just about any desktop software or gaming[…]

For them, Skylake might be tempting. Four years of modest yearly CPU performance improvements add up to a fairly big overall gain. The new additions in the chipset are definitely welcome, with super-fast M.2 solid-state storage, improved DDR4 memory, native USB 3.0, and the option of USB 3.1 ports on many retail motherboards. Throw in a decent cooling solution, an M.2 SSD, and do a little overclocking, and you’re getting a PC with next-generation technology and very strong performance.

That would suggest that the next iMacs will have USB C, and that SSD read/write rates will be measured in low GB/s instead of high MB/s.

Although editors would rather have dedicated GPUs in their Macs, the integrated graphics part of Skylake CPUs have some post-relevant improvements such as hardware support for UHD/4K decoding and encoding. According to Anandtech:

Skylake gets a full, low power fixed function HEVC decoder. For desktop users this shouldn't impact things by too much - maybe improve compatibility a tad - but for mobile platforms this should significantly cut down on the amount of power consumed by HEVC decoding and increase the size and bitrate that the CPU can decode.

[…] Intel is also hedging their bets on HEVC by also implementing a degree of VP9 support on Skylake. VP9 is Google's HEVC alternative codec, with the company pushing it as a royalty-free option.

Ars Technica:

There’s no doubt that in terms of single and multithreaded and performance, Intel’s Core i7-6700K is the best quad-core chip on the market. In a high-end consumer PC, particularly for gaming, there’s nothing better. If you’re shopping for a new desktop PC, get one with a Skylake chip.

As regards what most editors need in a future Macs, instead of faster CPUs perhaps we should be looking for faster CPUs that are able to connect to more devices using higher bandwidths.

Lunch with Philip and Greg: Alex Gollner

Tuesday, 04 August 2015

As part of my recent trip to California in June, I took part in a new video podcast: Lunch with Philip and Greg.

When I started I wasn't sure of how the show worked, so monopolised the ‘conversation’ and talked pretty quickly. I talked about my first Final Cut plugin, my most complex Final Cut Classic plugin.

I pontificated on 4K, HDR, 360º video, this blog, Pat Inhofer’s Tao of Color blog and newsletter, why Final Cut Pro X plugins shouldn't be as complex as Motion. 

If you want to skip the autobiography section, start 10 minutes in! 

After a while Philip and Greg get a few words in edgeways. Watch us talk for an hour about the state of play for post production plugins and much more...

iOS 10 Audio transcription service: For OS X please!

Monday, 03 August 2015

Business Insider reports that Apple are testing a voicemail transcription service that might debut in iOS 10:

iCloud Voicemail can relay information about where you are and why you can't pick up the phone to certain people. But the coolest feature of the service is that Siri will transcribe any incoming voicemails, just like it does with anything else you say to it.

[…]

Multiple Apple employees are currently testing iCloud Voicemail. Business Insider understands that if the service works reliably enough then it is currently scheduled to be launched in 2016, presumably with the iOS 10 mobile operating system.

Cloud-based transcription would also be very useful for video editing. 

Once Siri for OS X can transcribe audio, I’ll point it to a few TB of video clips to add some useful metadata for editing!

If clips already have fully transcribed text included as metadata before being imported into Final Cut,  features that search, change or display that metadata won’t require patent licences associated with working with scripts in editing software.

 

The BBC and Final Cut Pro X: Any progress?

Monday, 03 August 2015

As the UK’s publically funded broadcaster, the BBC is not allowed to endorse any specific product or service, either on air or in third-party publicity. That means that companies that make the tools that the BBC uses cannot get quotes from BBC members of staff that speak for the whole of the organisation.

Avid cannot get a quote from BBC Studios saying “Over 90% of BBC Drama is editing using Media Composer.” They can refer to specific customers who do work for the BBC.

This is true of Apple and the BBC’s use of Final Cut Pro X. In a big story from last year concerning the use of Final Cut in news acquisition first reported on fcp.co, there were no official quotes that represented the BBC.  

This was true of the BBC when Final Cut Pro 5, 6 and 7 were being increasingly used.

Although that there are rumours that Final Cut Pro X is being taught to everyone in the BBC but experienced editors, all we have on record are a few news stories and mentions of Final Cut by staff and freelancers in social media. Interestingly for those interested in the progress of Final Cut in the BBC, Twitter is a public social media platform where people who work there have bios that state that their opinions aren't official policy of the BBC.

I've started a collection of public tweets on the subject of the BBC and Final Cut Pro X - mostly by people who work for the BBC. 

It seems that X is being widely used in News, but there is little evidence of it spreading to BBC Drama. This might change once new production companies not brought up in the Avid tradition are commissioned to make shows and films for the BBC. This might be how X started being being used in BBC Sport.

Given the limitations of BBC endorsements, I hope others create similar collections for other NLEs.

London high-end post already working with Final Cut Pro X

Friday, 31 July 2015

The big effects-heavy launch trailer for Angry Birds 2 came out yesterday. Like some high-end TV commercials and music videos made in London, much of the post production was done using Final Cut Pro X. This is true of big commercials for Perrier and Sony as well as this high profile campaign for Sport England.

As elsewhere in the world of post, in London using Final Cut Pro X is seen as not being “the professional’s choice.” The irony is that some of the established big post companies who have been working on X jobs for many months may not have realised they are already working with it.

In many cases during big productions, Final Cut Pro X is used during the shoot, the edit, for temporary effects and audio mix. The quality is been good enough to pass to production companies, advertising agencies and the to client for approval.

Once the offline is signed off, various companies work on VFX, the grade, the audio mix and the final online. As long as each company gets the correct materials turned over to them, it makes no difference if the offline was done in Avid, Premiere, Final Cut Pro X or iMovie.

This might be one of the reasons why people say “I don't know anyone who works with Final Cut Pro X.” 

Once the speed and quality of offlines done using Final Cut Pro X becomes better known, there’s a chance that some specialist companies will suddenly announce that they work well with content prepared using Final Cut: “We've worked on Final Cut Pro X jobs since 2014, come and work with us.”

Facebook: Huge growth in video sharing

Thursday, 30 July 2015

From yesterday's Facebook Q2 results analyst telephone conference as transcribed by Seeking Alpha:

Mark Zuckerberg: …if you go back 10 years, most of how people communicated and shared was text. We are going through a period where now it's mostly visual and photos. We are entering into a period where that's going to increasingly be primarily video, and we're seeing huge growth there.

[…]

Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg: So over 1 million SMBs (Small and medium-sized busiensses) have posted a video on Facebook, which is pretty amazing, because I doubt 1 million SMBs have ever run what is a video or TV ad. 

What tools will these millions of business owners and Facebook users be using to make their Facebook videos? Facebook and Google favour online applications. Adobe, Apple and Avid will promote mobile apps and computer applications.

As the market expects video tools to be free or almost free, price won't be a differentiator - maybe features won’t be a differentiator. It'll come down to the user interface. The editing metaphors that win the mass consumer battle will the basis of future editing UIs for everyone.

Frequency of words in the analyst call: 

  • Facebook: 62
  • ads: 49
  • video: 34
  • ad: 33
  • mobile: 33
  • Instagram: 31

KeyFlow Pro: How it might work with Final Cut Pro X in future

Wednesday, 29 July 2015

New on the Mac App Store: KeyflowPro from Malgn Technology. fcp.co has the story:

The problem with MAMs or Media Asset Management systems was that they were expensive and required a lot of hardware to service them. Not anymore. The newly launched KeyFlow Pro is $299 and can run on a MacBook Pro. A very interesting new app.

Up until now, the use of MAMs in video editing has been only for large installations who can afford the installation and support of such a project.

KeyFlow Pro has jut been released and is set to change all of that. For just $299, any user who needs their video files cataloging and organising can run a MAM that has been designed to work on a Mac and of course integrate with Final Cut Pro X.

Some will recognise elements of other media asset managers, but its integration with Final Cut Pro X metadata opens up other opportunities.

The 'Key' in KeyFlow Pro is short for 'Keyword'

Keywords flow in and out of KeyFlow Pro. Keywords added to footage and stills in KeyflowPro are applied as keywords to clips in Final Cut. You can also share directly from a Final Cut timeline into a KeyflowPro library. As well as the movie file, you have the option to include the X XML version of the timeline as well. The metadata added in Final Cut also appears associated with the shared movie in KeyFlow Pro.

As well as being a very interesting product today, version 1 points the way to future possibilities:

  • If KeyFlow Pro can point to media inside Final Cut Pro libraries, it could use X-generated proxies to display footage and stills in KFPro libraries (it generates H.264 proxies at the moment)
  • If a future version Final Cut Pro X could export a reference movie Quicktime of a timeline (a movie that refers to other movies to play back), when that movie is imported into KeyFlow Pro, the clips used (and their metadata) could be added to the KFPro library
  • KeyFlow Pro library to Final Cut Pro X library round-tripping and vice-versa (including titles, title renders and title proxy renders from and to Final Cut)
  • KeyFlow Pro Proxy libraries that would be linked to a parent library on a main server that could remain on portable Macs - only the proxies would need to update as the parent changes due to other user updates. The Final Cut library on the local machine would use the local KFPro to show proxy media. When reconnected with the main server, the Final Cut library would be able to use media managed by the parent KFPro library

As well as inpsiring Apple to create their X version of Final Cut Server, I hope KeyFlow Pro also inspires other developers such as Arctic Whiteness - makers of Final Cut Library Manager

FCP.co supremo Peter Wiggins interview

Tuesday, 28 July 2015

Peter Wiggins, the power behind fcp.co * - the best independent Final Cut Pro X website and plugin makers Idustrial Revolution is the latest guest in the new ‘Lunch with Philip and Greg’ video podcast:

Peter Wiggins [38:46]: A year after Final Cut Pro X came out, I compared it to a Forumla 1 racing car. It could go very fast, but it couldn't turn left. They invented a chassis that can go very fast. What they've done in the four years they've built the thing up so it can go really fast. Yes you can come off at the corner - there are gotchas - but compared with the other NLEs, they've put a turbocharger on, trying to make their old one go faster, but there's a limit and it won't go any faster.

* - when I first discovered this site in 2011, I was surprised that Colombia was a big enough market to host a Final Cut website. Oops.

Uh oh: “Have patents relevant to internet video streaming? Want royalties?”

Tuesday, 28 July 2015

Patent negotiation group MPEG-LA:

World licensing leader MPEG LA, LLC today announced a call for patents essential to the MPEG Dynamic Adaptive Streaming over HTTP (DASH) standards for the purpose of offering the market efficient access to this important technology. Currently used in leading content delivery platforms, DASH adaptively streams audio and video content enabling continuous viewing without freezing or stuttering.

[...] MPEG LA President and CEO Larry Horn. “We invite all patent holders to participate.”

 

Jan Ozer:

How many companies considering the transition from Flash to HTML5 incorporated DASH-related content-royalties into their budgets? How many questioned whether or not DASH would be supported by every current browser? Though it is today, the specter of royalties could change that quickly.

The timing of this story didn’t allow for any industry reaction, but it’s going to be fascinating to watch over the next few days and weeks. At the least, it’s a minor speed bump in the Flash to HTML5 transition, but for some, it might also become a brick wall.

Science examines edits: 7 types of narrative discontinuity in popular movies

Tuesday, 28 July 2015

From a scientific paper: “Event segmentation and seven types of narrative discontinuity in popular movies” by James E. Cutting:

These results suggest that there are at least four different signatures of narrative shifts to be found in popular movies — general patterns across time, patterns of historical change, genre-specific patterns, and film-specific patterns.

[...]

...the structure of popular movies, and the changes in that structure over the last 80 years, are fit to perceptual and cognitive processes that allow movies to be faster paced but still easy to understand. Moreover, we know that in real life and in movies this segmentation process is an aid to memory and comprehension. Thus, understanding the reasons for why and how viewers segment movies into events brings us closer to understanding why we find them such a powerful component of contemporary visual culture.

Once a system is analysed, others will attempt to encode this analysis into algorithms. 

And I thought editors would never be disintermediated…

Judith Allen found this.

iOS app replaces professional editor with algorithm

Tuesday, 28 July 2015

Triller is a music video app:

…the app will then automatically edit your takes together using an algorithm that’s designed to emulate how a professional editor would cut a music video. Triller looks at the action in your footage, how much the camera itself is moving, and how many faces are detected in each shot to make its editorial decisions. It then cuts everything into tiny clips that are perfectly synced with the song you’ve chosen.

Blackmagic DaVinci Resolve 2005

Monday, 27 July 2015

Before Blackmagic Design bought da Vinci Systems in 2009, they had years of hardware and software product history.

Thanks to the Internet Archive, their website from 10 years ago is still preserved. 

Included in the archive is a PDF leaflet:

From the genius of da Vinci comes Resolve®, the company’s first software-based color correction system

Note however: 

Resolve2K and 2K Plus are registered trademarks of da Vinci Systems, Inc.

The Onion: Exhausted Video Editor Can't Tell If Blooper Reel Is Funny Anymore

Monday, 27 July 2015

The Onion, 2006:

Lessner, who said he started the weekend session laughing at the abundance of "blooper gold," soon lost all perspective when faced with the task of condensing the more than 86 hours of footage—most of which was "almost indistinguishably hilarious"—into a single 26-minute special by his strict Sunday deadline.

4K playback costs: HEVCAdvance content royalty schedule

Monday, 27 July 2015

For people to share video using advanced codecs on the internet and elsewhere, the codecs have to be developed in the first place. The cost of development is then recouped using patent licenses. Sometimes a fee is charged for building a player - whether on a website or in a modern TV, sometimes a free is charged on each time content is played. Paying per play is known as a content royaty.

There are two groups of patent holders associated with the codecs associated with UHD and 4K playback. The HEVC group aren't charging content royalties, but a second (made up of GE, Technicolor, Mitsubishi, Philips, and Dolby) have just announced their royalty rate.

Jan Ozer has just ran the numbers:

For a $4.00 movie downloaded from Amazon Prime or M-Go, the royalty would be two cents, right in line with MPEG-2/H.264 content royalties. In a Netflix scenario, for a $10/month subscriber who watches 10% of video that uses HEVC, the royalty would only apply to 10% of the subscription price, so the royalty would be about half a penny ($0.005). Assuming the $10 subscriber watches 100% HEVC, the royalty would be a nickel.

HEVCAdvance expects the royalty to be calculated on gross numbers, not on a per-subscriber basis. For an advertising supported site, if HEVC was 30% of all video distributed, the calculation would be 30% x total video-related advertising revenue x .005. In this scenario, if video-related advertising revenue was $1 billion, the royalty would be $1,000,000,000 x .3 x .005, or $1.5 million, a far cry from the $120 million Apple is staring at.

[...]

...no matter how much you dislike the terms offered by HEVCAdvance, dealing with the individual patent holders would have likely been more expensive, and certainly more complicated. IP rights are a reality, so like the T-shirt says, the market will keep calm and carry on.

Read more at the Streaming Learning Center.

Blackmagic DaVinci Resolve 12 Beta 1

Monday, 27 July 2015

Now available from Blackmagic support page: the first public beta of the next big release of DaVinci Resolve.

Version 12 adds many timeline editing features. Although it looks a lot like Final Cut Pro X, Resolve 12 still uses the track-based metaphor it has had for years.

Final Cut-related features included in the long read me for Resolve 12 Studio:

  • VST and AU Audio Plugin Support
  • Support for FCPX XML 1.5 DTD roundtrip
  • Support for multicam and audio layout for FCPX XML roundtrip
  • Media storage sub-clip generation (reduce footage to that used in timeline plug handles)
  • Export to ProTools
  • QuickTime support for DNxHR codec

The names of the free and paid versions of Resolve are changing with version 12. The free version was called DaVinci Resolve Lite, the $995 version was called DaVinci Resolve.

From now on, the paid version will be known as DaVinci Resolve Studio and the free version will be simply DaVinci Resolve.

The differences between the two versions mentioned in the Resolve 12 read me:

The free DaVinci Resolve 12 includes all of the same high quality processing as DaVinci Resolve 12 Studio and can handle unlimited resolution media files. However it does limit project mastering and output to Ultra HD resolutions or lower. DaVinci Resolve 12 only supports a single processing GPU on Windows and 2 GPUs on the latest Mac Pro.

If you need features such as support for multiple GPUs, 4K output, motion blur effects, temporal and spatial noise reduction, 3D stereoscopic tools, remote rendering, an external database server and collaboration tools that let multiple users work on the same project at the same time, please upgrade to DaVinci Resolve 12 Studio.

We hope you do decide to upgrade as your facility grows and you do more advanced work!

Although there are usually dangers associated with using beta-quality software, many people report that past beta software from Blackmagic has done little damage to their systems!

What’s new?

Alex Van Hurkman wrote the Resolve 12 manual. He's summarised the version 12 changes on his blog:

Given the massive collection of features in this year’s release, the accompanying User Manual update was similarly enormous, and now that the manual has cracked the 1000 page mark (1095 pages in the beta version), with 704 new and updated screenshots at last count, it was clearly time to do a full reorganization of the chapters, in an effort to make it easier to find the information you’re looking for.

My free Apple Motion webinar: Exploring animation behaviors

Friday, 24 July 2015

It took me years before I got my mind around Apple Motion. I spent a long time trying to learn how to do complex multi-layer keyframed motion graphics like I used to make in Adobe After Effects. I clicked with Motion once I had a more straightforward task: make a simple plugin for Final Cut Pro X.

After making many Final Cut plugins and motion graphics sequences with Motion, I've come to know it well. One of the two sessions I taught at the 2015 FCPX Creative Summit was about using Motion's behaviors for animation.

I'll be teaching a webinar version of that session on Tuesday called "Exploring Apple Motion Behaviors for Easy Animation": 

The real power behind Apple Motion is behaviors. Behaviors use the power of complex calculations and real-time rendering to produce results in minutes that would take hours to create and modify using keyframes or complex math. Behaviors can control almost everything in Motion — including graphics, text, particles and cameras. Alex will show behaviors controlling graphics and particles and show how much fun you can have by playing with behaviors in Motion.

Register for free to watch live and ask questions at the Moviola website.

Final Cut Pro X and mobile journalism: Audio and metadata

Friday, 24 July 2015

In recent years, more of TV and internet news features recordings made on mobile phones. iPhones and Andoid phones are also being used by professional journalists. The art and science of using consumer technology this way is known as Mobile Journalism. There are blogs, Twitter hashtags and conferences on the subject. 

Final Cut Pro X is the editing software 'for the rest of us' - designed for professionals in many fields as well as editing. That means broadcast news organisations are training all sorts of staff in using X (Some would say everyone but the editors).

After a few years of steadily improving camera phones and video editing applications that run on iOS and Android, the quality of mobile audio recording is now catching up. Recent devices bypass microphones designed for telephone conversations.

Recently Glen Mulcahy of Irish national TV and radio broadcaster RTÉ compared two systems that connect via the iPhone's lightning port:

Today I got my hands on the Sennheiser ClipMic Digital mic for iOS so I decided to shoot a quick unboxing video and then do an audio test and a video test to pitch it against the iKmultimedia iRigPro and AKG 417pp Lav which we currently use for Mobile Journalism here in RTÉ.

He used the Apogee MetaRecorder iOS app which includes metadata tagging for those editing MoJo footage in Final Cut Pro X.

Ripple Training's video on how marker, keyword and role information captured on location can be imported into Final Cut:

ClipMic Digital is a new Microphone from Sennheiser that turns your iPhone or iPad into a professional digital audio recorder. By downloading the companion App from Apogge, you can record and add metadata to your recordings that can be read my Final Cut Pro X via XML. This is one of the COOLEST app/mics we've ever used!

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